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Case Studies

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BLES TRAINING CASE STUDIES

Callum, age 16, found his Mum dead at home of a heroin overdose in May this year and admitted he did not know how to deal with his grief.  His attendance was affected by this and post mortem results only came through on 27th July with the funeral then taking place the following week.  As a result of all the trauma once again, Callum turned to alcohol and drank for two days making himself ill.  We did make allowances for Callum because of his personal issues and did return to BLES.  He talked with Anne at length about his feelings of hating his Mum, how he found it hard staying with his Dad now as he didn’t really know his Dad and the feeling of just not wanting to get up in the morning.  He voiced on a number of occasions that he felt there was no point to anything anymore and although he did like it at BLES and wanted to come in to training, it felt like something physical was stopping him.  We did try to arrange bereavement counselling but the only suggestion was that he was referred via CAHMS which has an eighteen month waiting list! He did not want his attendance to continue to be as bad as it had been and decided to end training.

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BLES TRAINING CASE STUDIES

Daniel is a young man aged 17 who when he joined BLES, admitted he did have anger issues and did not work well in groups.  Daniel has progressed enormously within the BLES environment however recently we did notice a change in Daniel’s behaviour which raised concerns.  One day, Daniel reported to the office and was in tears and very distressed.  He talked at length with Anne and Lynne which included thoughts of suicide, self harm and generally, not wanting to be part of life any more.  As a result of this episode, we did contact various people to see if he could be referred for the correct counselling however were told that Daniel should speak to his doctor to be referred via CAHMS but would face an eighteen month wait.  Things appeared to settle for a couple of weeks then the same cycle started again however when talking to Anne and Jean, he confirmed he had a suicide plan in place to jump from the Forth Road Bridge.  He knew exactly how to get through a barrier to reach the bridge.  Again, we talked at length with Daniel and during the conversation, it came to light his home life is not as it should be with him being bullied from both his older brothers and sister.  This bullying does more often than not revert to physical violence with Daniel being beat up.  He does try to get his Mum on side with him but in Daniel’s words, she sees him as “being a waste of space”, therefore the support is not there for him from his parent.  After a row with his family recently, he admitted he had walked to Edinburgh (where he used to stay) and slept in a tree.  His Mum had not tried to contact him to see where he was.  Daniel feels totally alone with no-one there to support him.  He also admitted he smokes cannabis on a regular basis and describes himself as a heavy user although does not want to stop smoking as this is his only release from his life.

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BLES TRAINING CASE STUDIES

Liam, age 16, smokes cannabis and drinks at weekends when with his friends.  His parents are separated and their relationship is not good.  His Mum is a heavy drinker and this leads to arguments and Liam constantly being kicked out of the house.  He also told us he saw his Mum “shooting up” with heroin when he was 4 years old and remembers the look in her eyes.  He has attempted to speak to family members about this on a number of occasions and they are not interested and tell him he’s making it up.  He did stay with his gran for a while however because of his cannabis smoking and drinking, his gran did not want him to stay.  He received a large sum of money which increased his circle of “friends” for a while but needless to say, once the money was gone, so were his friends.  Liam considers himself to be depressed but doesn’t want to go to the doctor and again the support from his parents is not there to encourage him to get help.  Obviously smoking cannabis is not helping but Liam sees this as the only thing that’s helping him.  He feels he is constantly let down by everyone around him and feels so alone and no-one to turn to.